Trinity Connections

Pastor Phil Wold

philwold@gmail.com cell - 307-763-1115

Trinity Connections

Saturday, May 30

Above all, maintain constant love for one another,

for love covers a multitude of sins.

I Peter 4:4

Monday we looked at First Peter - - we turn to this book again today. I had this on a list of verses, and looked past it a number of times, not sure I wanted to stop and reflect on this multitude of sins comment.

(I am afraid this needs to be said: We would never want to quote this in such a way that we encourage a person to stay in an abusive situation - that requires a person to get away from the abuse - be safe - forgive but not return to abuse…)

This is an interesting teaching, isn’t it?

I wonder if one needs to elaborate on this at all, or simply put it out there; and encourage everyone to take a close look and consider what this might mean for you. “Above all, maintain constant love for one another, for love covers a multitude of sins.” I Peter 4:4



Friday, May 29

“From now on, therefore, we regard no one from a human point of view;

even though we once knew Christ from a human point of view, we know him no longer in that way.

So if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away; see, everything has become new!”

II Corinthians 5:16-17

In a fascinating article (by a guy who was not a Christian) the author said that one thing that he thought many Christians did not understand about their own faith, was the extent to which the New Testament testifies to God doing something new in Jesus. “Everything has become new!”

From the outside looking in, he thought we might be missing out. I suspect he’s got a point there…

What newness might Jesus be offering you, if only you stop to notice?



Thursday, May 28

“As God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience.

Bear with one another and, if anyone has a complaint against another, forgive each other;

just as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive.

Above all, clothe yourselves with love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony.”

Colossians 3:12-15

My mentor, Pastor Joe Wahlin liked to preach on Colossians 3 for weddings. In part, these beautiful words invite us to reflect on how love binds us together. This reading also points to the centrality of forgiveness for any relationship to thrive. It also brings together compassion, kindness and more that is often overlooked when our culture talks about love…

Laura and I were married 37 years ago today, and while I may want to wax poetic about love, I could only do that, in light of forgiveness given. (Let’s not venture on which one has had to do more of the forgiving!)

Forgiveness has not been the subject of nearly as many songs, nor so many poems, as love, it is true.

But forgiveness might well be the more wonderful mystery.


Wednesday, May 27

“Be still and know that I am God.”

Psalm 46:10

I know, it is a bit of incongruous for someone who talks as much as I do to share this word: “be still.” Yet here you go. Is it “do as I say, not as I do?" Maybe so.

Of course, there are all sorts of things that we know are wise counsel, but we are not so good at following. And so, maybe my sharing this word with you today is a bit like telling you to eat right and exercise. Maybe not at all.

Try it. Stop for second.

Take note.

That one who steps into the silence… that one, will never leave you.

Peace be with you today and always…


Tuesday, May 26

There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called to the one hope of your calling, one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all, who is above all and through all and in all.

Ephesians 4:4

It is wonderful to consider the unity that is given in Christ. While it might be tempting to imagine that the early Church knew this unity better than anyone, that they had no divisions, no conflict at all; one need not read Paul’s letters too closely to see that this was not the case. In part, I suspect this tells us not to look too closely at our own shortcomings, but to look ever more closely toward God and the gifts God gives through Jesus Christ.

When we do that, there is so very much to take in, faith, hope and life - community and a calling to join God in loving the world!


Monday, May 25

Cast all your anxiety on him,

because he cares for you.

I Peter 5:7

Yesterday, our daughter Susie graduated from Luther College with a degree in Environmental Studies. Also, yesterday, our 2nd lesson included I Peter 5:7.

I remember as a freshman in college, this verse accompanied me through many challenges and adventures. I suspect that this is also a good word for a college grad. And maybe her parents. And probably grandparents, siblings and friends. A word of comfort and counsel to take your concerns and anxieties to the God who takes note of the sparrow, and will watch over you as well.

+ + +

It is Memorial Day weekend, and we will strive to have the Church open each day so people can step into the sanctuary or the chapel for a time of prayer.

+ + +

Two Memorial Day Prayers from our tradition:

Almighty and everlasting God, whose providence guides your people in diligent service, bless the officers and enlisted women and men of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, and Coast Guard as they perform the duties of their calling. Give them not only true love of country but also love of you and an understanding of your love for all people; so that, relying upon your guidance, they may courageously defend our nation from every foe, promote justice, honor, and unity among our people, and be a means of fostering mutual respect and understanding among all peoples of the world; through Jesus Christ, your Son and our Lord. Amen.

From Prayer in Time of War for Church and Home, prepared by the Common Service Book Committee of the United Lutheran Church in America, © 1942 United Lutheran Publication House.

Those who have given their lives

Eternal God, we give thanks for all those who have shown the greatest love by laying down their lives for others. We especially thank you for those in our military throughout history who have sacrificed their lives for their fellow citizens and for us who came after. As we remember their service, keep us mindful of all those for whom this day is a burden, and send your spirit of comfort to them. Be present with all the women and men who are serving in the military today. Let them live for the peace known only from you. Help us to be worthy of their legacy, and keep us mindful of their service, that in all things we may live our lives in praise and thanksgiving to you; through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord. Amen.

From Evangelical Lutheran Worship Prayer Book for the Armed Services (Augsburg Fortress, 2013), p. 65.


Saturday, May 23

Pour out your spirit Lord:

that we may dream your dream.

Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals

This week I’ve been sharing prayers from the book: “Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals.” (2010, Zondervan)

Yesterday, our prayer addressed God’s promise to take away our fears. Today we pray that we might dream God’s dream. God’s dream for you is life and salvation. This gift bears comfort to you when you are in the “valley of the shadow.” God’s dream offers hope when all is lost, and bears a promise that will even raise the dead.

While our fears distract us, recalling God’s dream is to tap into the hope that is ours in Jesus Christ.

May your dreams be infused and inspired by God’s dream for you and all the world.

It is Memorial Day weekend, and we will strive to have the Church open each day so people can step into the sanctuary or the chapel for a time of prayer.

Pour out your spirit Lord:

that we may dream your dream.


Friday, May 22

Hide us under the shadow of your wing:

and deliver us from fear.

Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals

This week I am sharing prayers from the book: “Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals.” (2010, Zondervan)

We do not speak very often of “the fear of the Lord.” I know we understand that this sort of fear is reverence and respect and love and humility, but we don’t often use the term. It has seemed off-putting to us. Yet “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom…” Proverbs tells us. (9:10)

While appropriate fear can help us to be safe and to build a healthy society, much of the fear we see in our world is destructive to community. Another prayer I considered sharing from Common Prayer: A liturgy for Ordinary Radicals was this: “Overwhelm us with your love: which casts out every fear.”

Often the prayers of our liturgies ask God to deliver us from fear, echoing the Psalms, which, over and over, speak of God’s protection. Embracing “fear of the Lord” can help us to be a little less afraid of so many other things that occupy our minds, and distract us from God’s goodness. Fear of the Lord can call us to justice and love, and send us forth to live the full life God intends for all.

Hide us under the shadow of your wing:

and deliver us from fear.


Thursday, May 21

O Love that keeps the heavens turning:

draw us to you in all our yearnings.

Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals


This week I am sharing prayers from the book: “Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals,” (2010, Zondervan) which are included daily in a planner called Sacred Ordinary Days. This prayer was provided for Valentines Day.

February 14. That day when we celebrate our loves, when children share valentines at school, restaurants are crowded, and florists are busy (oh, may those days return soon!).

On that day, and, really, every day - - to pray that our yearnings might draw us to God is powerful.

Today is Ascension Day, the 40th Day of Easter. The first chapter of Acts tells us that after Jesus ascended to heaven, angels appeared to the disciples and they said, “Men of Galilee, why do you stand looking up toward heaven?” and Luke tells us that the disciples; “returned to Jerusalem with great joy…”

The disciples learned that the resurrection and ascension of Jesus had transformed their yearnings. They now had a mission and a calling, and were to get going - following Jesus - rather than looking off toward heaven..

If I’m not careful, this devotion could begin to look like a long chapter of a book. And so - - - may your yearnings be shaped by Jesus, who has ascended into heaven, so that he might be with us wherever we go…

From the editor of Sacred Ordinary Days, Jenn Giles Kemper, I share this benediction for Ascension Day:

My Lord has died.

Jesus, my Lord is risen.

Jesus our Lord will come again

to take us to Himself –

that where He is

we may be also.

Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

We look for You

and long for your returning.

When all is ready

and time is ripe

gather us into Your arms.

(from Ascension Liturgy, Celtic Daily Prayer: Prayers and Readings from The Northumbria Community, 1994, HarperCollins)


Wednesday, May 20

In the light of the morning Lord:

tune our hearts to sing your praise.

Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals

This week I am sharing prayers from the book: “Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals.”

My dad had a joyful way about him. When this wonderful spring weather would arrive, he liked to say: “this is why we have winter!” This was probably large part, his upbeat personality. Yet his joy was also shaped by a seeking to praise God for God’s good gifts.

I like that line, “this is why we have winter,” and I use it whenever I can. The gift of the Gospel shines forth any time, in any weather, through any experience of life. Praise of God can give shape to any day, the great days and the difficult days, the sunny and beautiful days, and those with terrible weather. It is not “in spite of” life’s difficulties that God’s love shines forth. God steps into the very midst of every single aspect of your life, with unbounded grace, and unending love.

And so, may we join together in prayer: In the light of the morning Lord: tune our hearts to sing your praise.

Tuesday, May 19

If I stand, let me stand on your promise:

when I fall, let me fall on your grace.

Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals

As I mentioned yesterday, this week I am sharing prayers from the book: “Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals” - by Shane Claiborne, Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove , Enuma Okoro. Zondervan (2010)

I like the insight that much “religion” is a sort of “if-then” proposition. If you are good, then good things will come your way, you will receive blessings.

The good news of the Gospel, is that your God operates with a “because - therefore” approach. Because God loves you, therefore, God has sent Jesus to make you whole.

It’s not “if-then.” It is “if-when.”

What a powerful thing to pray… “When I fall, let me fall on your grace.”

May you know God’s grace always, when you stand, when you fall, when you are lost, when you are found, when you rise for the day, and when you rest from your labors.

If I stand, let me stand on your promise: when I fall, let me fall on your grace.


Monday, May 18

Steep us in your story Lord,

that we may live its truth today.

Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals

I have a daily planner called Sacred Ordinary Days. It is oriented to the seasons of the Church calendar, and has a one (or sometimes 2) line prayer each day. That prayer is from the book: “Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals.” These prayers are inspired by scripture and - it seems to me - the Book of Common Prayer.

Today’s Common Prayer invites us to note that God has included us in God’s story of love for the world. Included in God’s story, we are empowered to live it. May you live God’s love all day today.

Peace to you

Saturday, May 16

Today’s prayer is a bit different it is a prayer in the face of the loss and grief at the death of a loved one…

Jesus our Friend,

you wept at the grave of Lazarus,

you know all our sorrows.

Behold our tears, and bind up the wounds of our hearts.

Through the mystery of your cross,

bring us into closer communion with you

and with one another.

Raise us from death into life.

And grant, in your mercy,

that with our loved one who has gone before us,

we may come to live, with you,

and with all whom we love,

in that home that you have prepared for us.

Amen

From the United Methodist Book of Worship, pg. 163 [edited]

A Methodist colleague and friend gave me the UMBOW (United Methodist Book of Worship) as a gift when we moved from Minnesota 27 years ago. It is like a hymnal, containing orders of service, prayers and litanies and only a few songs.

This beautiful prayer is one I have shared with a number of you in the face of deep loss.

Jesus’ tears at the grave of Lazarus are a beautiful mystery. Yes, they are his cry of sadness. Yet for us, we hear a cry of compassion.

Tomorrow is the 23rd anniversary of my mom’s death, and I remember this day differently each year. Now, as I approach the age she was then, I am ever more grateful for the mysterious ways in which Jesus brings us into closer communion with God and with one another as well.

Friday, May 15

O Lord, grant that I may meet the coming day in peace.

Help me in all things to rely upon Thy Holy Will.

In every hour of the day, reveal Thy will to me. Bless my dealings with all who surround me. Teach me to treat all that comes to me throughout the day with peace of soul, and with the firm conviction that Thy will governs all. In all my deeds and words, guide my thoughts and feelings. In unforeseen events, let me not forget that all are sent by Thee. Teach me to act firmly and wisely, without embittering and embarrassing others.

Give me the strength to bear the fatigue of the coming day with all that it shall bring.

Direct my will.

Teach me to pray.

Pray Thou Thyself in me.

Amen.

Although this prayer may go back to the famous mystic, theologian and spiritual director Archbishop François Fénelon of Cambrai (1651–1715), it is attributed in this form to Metropolitan Philaret of Moscow (1782-1867). The Serbian Orthodox priest shared this at a Ministerial meeting in Butte years ago. I asked him for a copy. If I remember correctly, he suggested that this was a daily morning prayer for many Orthodox priests.

In many stories of the resurrection, Jesus’ first word to the disciples is “Peace.” This prayer reminds me that Jesus promises us peace that passes understanding. Perhaps especially in these days, the promise of peace comes as a much needed gift.

Peace to you!

Thursday, May 14

God, give me grace to accept with serenity the things that cannot be changed,

Courage to change the things which should be changed,

and the Wisdom to distinguish the one from the other.

Living one day at a time, Enjoying one moment at a time,

Accepting hardship as a pathway to peace,

Taking, as Jesus did, This sinful world as it is, Not as I would have it,

Trusting that You will make all things right,

If I surrender to Your will,

So that I may be reasonably happy in this life,

And supremely happy with You forever in the next.

Amen.

Reinhold Niebuhr

This prayer was written by theologian Reinhold Niebuhr in the 1930’s and has been adopted by AA and many other 12 Steps groups. Niebuhr was an important 20th century American theologian. Among the first theologians I encountered in seminary, I was surprised to learn he had authored this prayer.

I have never read this anywhere, but a professor of mine claimed that Niebuhr was in many ways, the author of the Marshall Plan, which fueled the post WWII rebuilding of Europe. Rather than punish Germany, it sought to bring people together and help in economic recovery for all the participating nations.

The Serenity Prayer has been a great gift to many, calling us to live a day at a time, with grace, gratitude and joy.


Wednesday, May 13

Morning Prayer

God of Light

Spirit of Compassion

You open up the morning skies again before me

You breathe in me the breath of life.

Be my guide in this new day

Be present with me and in me.

Heal me

Lift me

Stir me

Gift me

Let me be a blessing and sign of you to all I meet,

and let me find your blessing

and your sign in each one of them. Amen

We have a copy of this prayer in our kitchen, and whenever I take note of it, I smile. When my dad took David and me to Ecuador 6 years ago, his wife Solveig shared this for devotions one morning before we began working to provide dental care to the people who lived there.

“Let me be a blessing and sign of you…” Isn’t that a wonderful petition?

“…let me find your blessing and your sign in each one of them…” This petition might be greater still.

I know this, we surely did find God’s blessing and sign in those we met, and we were so deeply grateful for that gift and so richly blessed by God’s people there in the Amazon jungle!


Tuesday, May 12

Lord, we pray for the power to be gentle,

the strength to be forgiving,

the patience to be understanding,

and the endurance to accept the consequences

of holding to what we believe to be right.

May we put our trust in the power of good to overcome evil

and the power of love to overcome hatred.

We pray for the vision to see

and the faith to believe

in a world emancipated from violence.

Help us to devote our whole life, thought and energy

to the task of making peace,

praying always for the inspiration and the power

to fulfill the destiny for which we were created.

— from the Week of Prayer for World Peace, 1978

This prayer was for the 5th week of prayer for world peace, which is observed in the 8 days from the 2nd to the 3rd Sunday in October each year.

I am not certain where I found this prayer, perhaps from the Oxford Book of Prayer. (George Appleton ed., Oxford, NY; 1985)

This prayer, asking “for the power to be gentle…” - offers a wonderful image for us today. May you know God’s power, the power of “the lamb who was slain,” always.

Peace, Pastor Phil


Monday, May 11

Lord Jesus Christ,

Son of God,

have mercy on me,

a sinner

For Connections this week, I will share a prayer each day, from the ELW, our hymnal, from my wanderings, or from the Christian tradition.

Today I share a prayer from the Eastern Orthodox tradition, known as “The Jesus Prayer.” In the spiritual classic, The Way of a Pilgrim, a wandering Russian pilgrim seeks to fulfill the words of Paul, to “pray without ceasing." (I Thess 5:17)

I read the book some 40 years ago, and it was striking. It seemed to me to be a strangely over-literal reading of that verse, and an odd thing for him to wander around, asking spiritual advisors how to pray continually. It almost seemed pointless. But the continued focus on praying always had an impact on me that I can still recall.

The Jesus Prayer - “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner” - can be a powerful word to carry with you throughout the day, throughout your life. This prayer invites us to be always aware of God’s love and grace in everything we do.

May you know God’s presence throughout the day, today and always.

Peace, Pastor Phil

Lord Jesus Christ,

Son of God,

have mercy on me,

a sinner


Friday, May 8

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

Philippians 4:13

I just returned from presiding at the graveside funeral of Genella Haugen. I told her family that many of you were praying for them, and that you were grateful for Genella’s friendship.

A funeral is a time to touch base with grief - and to turn to God for strength.

“I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” This is a great word for all sorts of contexts. I suspect that many an athlete has used this word as encouragement in their training. I can see it on a t-shirt, spurring someone on to a good workout. For our walk with Christ, though, I think this is about living each day, turning to God in our sorrows, rejoicing in God’s many gifts, and knowing God’s presence always.

As we commend Genella to God’s care, we pray for the strength of Christ to bear up all who mourn, and to empower us in our living and our serving.

I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.

Philippians 4:13


Thursday, May 7

God is our refuge and strength,

a very present help in trouble.

Psalm 46:1

I have found that my spirits go up and down a bit more markedly these past few weeks. At times I feel that am handling these unpredictable times pretty well, at times… not so much.

This Psalm is the basis of Luther’s hymn A Mighty Fortress is Our God. Luther knew unpredictable times more profoundly than I ever could, I suspect. Luther points us to the unchangeable love of God poured forth in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus. He points to that certainty of faith, which rests secure in the knowledge that God has taken hold of you, and will never let you go. God truly is our refuge and strength, an abiding gift that promises to bear you through everything that might possibly come your way.

God is our refuge and strength,

a very present help in trouble.

Psalm 46


Wednesday, May 6

Do not fear, for I have redeemed you;

I have called you by name, you are mine.

Isaiah 43:1

These words of promise ring throughout the Old and New Testaments. From Genesis to Revelation we have the story of God, who has created you, and who longs to be in relationship with you, today, tomorrow, forever, come what may, no matter what.

As we continue to deal with this pandemic, and wonder and worry, it is so very good to remember God’s great care for you, that you might be known by name.

Thanks to Tim Barnes for taking on the Huffaker lawn task… thanks to those who are continuing care for the building and grounds, thank you to all who continue to give your generous support of Trinity!

Do not fear, for I have redeemed you;

I have called you by name, you are mine.

Isaiah 43:1


Tuesday, May 5

The LORD is near to the brokenhearted

and saves those who are crushed in spirit.

- Psalms 34:18

In this week of offering a Bible verse to reflect on and repeat to yourself during the next day, I started with “And be thankful.”

Today, we point to the ground of our thankfulness; the nearness of the Lord. In Jesus Christ, God has chosen to enter into our lives and to be with us bearing the promise of comfort and peace.

The gift of Jesus answers that great lament, “oh that you would tear open the heavens and come down…” (Isaiah 64). God has come to be with you, in all your joys and sorrows, in whatever place you are today. “The LORD is near to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit.” What a promise. As we consider all the challenges of this time, it is comforting to know that God does not reject you when you are disheartened. In fact, in Jesus, God draws near, and offers God’s amazing love and unending grace.

+++

Please join us for our Wednesday noon Bible Study. Just email me, and I’ll send the link.

Thank you to Xander Depew for mowing the church lawn, and the lawn at the Huffaker house. The yard around the yellow house needs weed and feed spread on it. Dan Hills has loaned a spreader and purchased fertilizer, if someone could do that for us in the next couple days, please let me know.

Peace, Pastor Phil

The LORD is near to the brokenhearted

and saves those who are crushed in spirit.

- Psalms 34:18


Monday, May 4

“And be thankful.”

Colossians 3:15b

This week, I plan to share a short Bible verse, and invite you to consider and think about and reflect on that verse for the next 24 hours. I start the week with just part of Colossians 3:15.

“And be thankful.”

While we have all sorts of concerns and challenges, we also have so many reasons for gratitude. The foundational reason for all gratitude and joy is the Easter promise of God’s love and life, forgiveness, mission and more given through Jesus Christ, and our belonging to God through him.

Be thankful. That verse can carry you through the whole day.

Here is a bit fuller quote from Colossians 3…

As God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved,

clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience.

Bear with one another and, if anyone has a complaint against another,

forgive each other;

just as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive.

Above all, clothe yourselves with love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony.

And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in the one body.

And be thankful.

Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly;

teach and admonish one another in all wisdom;

and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God.

And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus,

giving thanks to God the Father through him.

Colossians 3:12-17


Saturday, May 2

PSALM 23

The LORD is my shepherd, I shall not want.

He makes me lie down in green pastures.

He leads me beside still waters; he restores my soul.

He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,

I fear no evil; for you are with me;

your rod and your staff, they comfort me.

You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies;

you anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows.

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life,

and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD forever.


The Psalm for the Fourth Sunday of Easter is always Psalm 23. “The Lord is my shepherd.” These words bear great comfort, and I think it is kind of interesting. I grew up in the suburbs, and rarely saw animals that might need a shepherd, much less any shepherds. However, I know very well the need for a shepherd.

There is a Healing Prayer liturgy that quotes Matthew 9:34 - “ Then Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom, and curing every disease and every sickness.”

The next verse gives this important insight into Jesus and his mission : “When he saw the crowds, he had compassion for them, because they were harassed and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.”

Often, that names us well, harassed and helpless. At the same time, we are sheep with a shepherd. A shepherd willing to give his life for us. A shepherd who watches over us, and takes us in. Today, tomorrow, always.


The Prayer of the Day for 4 Easter:

O God our shepherd, you know your sheep by name and lead us to safety through the valleys of death. Guide us by your voice, that we may walk in certainty and security to the joyous feast prepared in your house, through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever. Amen.


Friday, May 1

I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that lived first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, lives in you. II Timothy 1:5


I got an email this morning telling me to “Check out today's devotional in "Christ in our Home.””

It was a reflection on how the writer could trace his faith back to his grandfather, (whom he never got to meet). Faith has an “I” element, of course, he says; yet “faith is fundamentally a “we” endeavor. Together we do not lose heart. Together we renounce the harmful things of this world. Together we proclaim not ourselves, but Jesus Christ.”

He concludes with this nice insight: “I will not see my grandfather face-to-face in this life. But when I gather with fellow Christians in worship, I see a room full of faithful faces. In this faith… …I share, by God's mercy, in the faith of my grandfather.”

I am grateful for all with whom I share faith in Jesus, and that includes you.

(In part, I think I got that note because today, Philip and James, Apostles, are commemorated in the Church calendar.)

Two notes:

1 - There are a number of copies of “Christ In Our Home” here in the Narthex, you might want to stop by and pick one up, or let me know and we’ll get it to you.

2 - The Church is open most days, in case you would like to spend some time in the sanctuary in prayer. If there are no cars in the front parking lot, you are welcome to come in.

Peace to you





The TRINITY CONNECTIONS reflections from previous months are on the

Connections March page and Connections April page